5 Things You Should Know Before Moving to Denmark

BY: Nicole Danielsen, Account Manager Denmark at MediCarrera

Denmark is well renowned for being one of the happiest countries in the world. The secret behind it? High living standards, a strong welfare system and a healthy balance between work and private life! Here’s what you should keep in mind before you move to Denmark:

 

1. Advanced healthcare system

The technology used in Danish healthcare is getting more and more advanced, especially with the development of new super hospitals, which will have the latest equipment. Skype consultations are now on trial basis in some regions, to make consultations for incapacitated patients easier.

 Information sharing is now under development, as every Danish citizen’s health record is stored in a confidential online platform. The purpose is to make it easier to treat each patient by knowing their entire health history.

2. Work-life balance

Working in the Danish healthcare system revolves around the work-life balance, as people treasure their free time. This prevents potential burn-outs and gives doctors and nurses the energy to dedicate themselves to every single patient. There’s even a so-called 11-hour rule, which says you can never work more than 11 hours in one shift and everyone is entitled to a daily rest period of at least 11 consecutive hours. You also get 6 weeks of paid vacation each year.

After relocating to Denmark, people that used to work long hours might experience some difficulties with extra time on their hands. It’s therefore important to engage in other activities such as sports or a book club. This helps expats settle down and building a social circle.

“Working in the Danish healthcare system revolves around the work-life balance, as people treasure their free time. This prevents potential burn-outs and gives doctors and nurses the energy to dedicate themselves to every single patient.”

3. Professional opportunities

The flat hierarchy gives the healthcare professionals a great opportunity for both growth and responsibility. It’s, therefore, necessary for each person to take his share of the workload, to be independent and make wise choices on their own. If you do so you will be rewarded and recognized.

This type of organization results in a relaxed and open atmosphere, where different specialists work together and benefit from each other’s experiences. It’s a business casual culture, where people are liberal and friendly.

4. Danish culture

The typical Dane will at first seem a bit reserved, but as soon as you get to know them you’ll see they’re actually very warm people. They are also modest and polite.

In Denmark, people trust the system, which enhances a take-it-as-it-comes mentality. Through school and other childcare, Danes learn about the importance of group work and independence.

5. Welfare system

The welfare system is based on a high public taxation, which gives the citizens an equal access to different services such as free healthcare, education and financial aid for students enrolled in a university over the age of 18.

If you’re unemployed, the state helps you financially until you get back on your feet. In some cases, you get paid 90% of your previous salary and in other cases, you get paid 14.993 DKK which is around 2.012 EU every month, depending on what you qualify for. This is all free of charge and is funded through public taxes.

Danish hospitals are looking for doctors with various profiles. If you are interested in career opportunities in Denmark register here.

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