PATHOLOGY IN SCANDINAVIA

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Working as a Pathologist in Sweden

Working as a pathologist in Sweden, you will deal with conditions at the levels of organs, tissues, cells and molecules, integrating subjects such as anatomy, histology, physiology, immunology and cell and molecular biology to understand causes and mechanisms for development and progression of various disease conditions.

As the subject is subsequently cross-boundary in its character, especially in treating various types of cancer, inflammatory and immunological conditions, you will need to work in close cooperation with other specialist doctors.

The majority of pathologists work in pathology departments in hospitals. Some pathologists are affiliated with special activities, such as forensic medicine, and many are involved in research. Specialists in pathology have a broad collaboration with general practitioners and most other specialties. It places great demands on pathologists’ range in knowledge and their ability to communicate with other doctors.  

Research in pathology in Sweden is mainly linked to the clinical diagnostic services in clinical pathology and cytology, which are part of laboratory medicine. Clinical samples are extensively used for research purposes, and an increasing number of samples are stored in biobanks for future analysis.

Working as a Pathologist in Norway

In Norway, pathology plays a key role in patient diagnosis, treatment and prognosis assessment. The daily work is mostly concerned with pathological anatomy and histology. Among other things, pathologists working in Norway diagnose almost all types of cancer which may be found in patients. The volume of tissue samples increases gradually, approximately 4 % per year in Norway.

The vast majority of pathologists work in pathology departments in hospitals. There are also some independent laboratories. Some pathologists are affiliated with special activities, such as forensic medicine, and many are more or less involved in research. Specialists in pathology have a broad collaboration with general practitioners and most other specialities. It places a great demand on pathologists’ range in knowledge and their ability to communicate with other doctors.  

When working as a pathologist in Norway, it is required that you keep yourself updated on medical and technological developments within the field.

Working as a Pathologist in Denmark

Working in the Danish healthcare system, you will have the opportunity to conduct researches and studies based on clinical and diagnostic conditions. Most of a pathologist’s role in Denmark is related to cancer diagnosis or autoimmune, inflammatory and degenerative diseases, so a good attitude towards collaborating and working closely with other specialist doctors is required.

Pathological anatomy and cytology is predominantly a hospital speciality. The vast majority of cell and tissue samples are thus investigated in the hospitals’ pathology departments.

Main techniques include:

  • Immunohistochemistry.
  • Hybridisation techniques (in situ hybridisation, FISH, SKY, PCR).
  • Flowcytometry, electron microscopy (TEM and cryo-immuno EM).
  • Stereological and morphometric techniques.
  • Karyotyping and cell and tissue cultures.

Molecular biology studies in the pathoanatomic direction have especially gained ground in diagnosis and treatment of cancer, and this development is expected to continue.