5 Things That Make Norway Family-Friendly

BY: Ingve Groven, Account Manager Norway at MediCarrera

Parent-friendly policies are just one part of Norway’s welfare state. Everyone is covered by public health insurance, meaning free healthcare at the point of access. The country offers free public schools as well as higher education, and workers rights and unions are strong. If you lose your job or fall ill, the welfare system has your back. The Norwegian society invests in its residents and has a positive attitude towards family life. Here’s what makes Norway a family-friendly country:

1. Flexible parental leave

Norway’s system is flexible and generous. Mothers can take 35 weeks at full pay or 45 weeks at 80% pay, and fathers can take between zero and 10 weeks depending on their wives’ income. Together, parents can receive an additional 46 weeks at full pay or 56 weeks at 80% of their income. Fathers are more or less obliged to take a minimum of two months of parental leave. Due to the system companies accept that the father won’t be at work for some time and everybody finds that normal.

2. A right to daycare

As a citizen in Norway, you have the fundamental right to daycare. If the town doesn’t have enough places, they have to build more daycares. In this way, you are sure that there will always be a spot for your child. The maximum price is €300, but it can be less according to your private situation. This amount is generally lower than in any other country.

3. Free education and healthcare

In Norway, you don’t have to pay for school. Until the age of 18, the government provides free schooling and all the school supplies (books and other material). School is usually a walking distance from your home. You also get free healthcare until the age of 18. For example, going to the dentist for a checkup or getting medication is free. 

“As a citizen in Norway, you have the fundamental right to daycare. If the town doesn’t have enough places, they have to build more daycares.”

4. Flexibility at work

The work-life in Norway is very flexible. Employers provide you with a flexible holiday arrangement and are excessively patient with people and their families. You always have time for your family and their needs. However, this doesn’t mean you don’t have to work.

5. Family activities

Norwegian cities are well equipped with parks and playgrounds. There are a lot of activities for families in the cities and nearby. Sports activities are the most popular; families can go skiing or play all kinds of sports during the weekends. If you’re a doctor or a nurse looking for career opportunities in a family-friendly country register here.

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